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Transformative Beauty
Art Museums in Industrial Britain

Amy Woodson-Boulton


2012

288 pp.
16 figures.
ISBN: 9780804778046
Cloth $55.00
ISBN: 9780804780537
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"The wealth of original archival research has created a reliable history of these museums, providing context for not only museological and social studies, but also indicating a further network of meanings for the reception of Pre-Raphaelite art and Victorian painting in general."—Alisa Boyd, Journal of the Pre-Raphaelite Studies

"Transformative Beauty lays bare the paradoxes and ambiguities that characterized the sociopolitical meaning of art in the Victorian age . . . In venturing to elucidate what art and museums came to represent, Transformative Beauty is informative and provides an interesting read. For students of the Victorian city there is much to gain. For historians the work helps bridge the gap between the genres of social history and visual cultural studies."—Ian Morley, American Historical Review

"This is a splendid study of museum building in the great provincial cites of England: Manchester, Birmingham, and Liverpool. It is striking how different each city was. Woodson-Boulton provides illuminating insights into the relationship of culture and power, set within intriguging stories. The author enters deeply into the minds of the Victorians, making clear how they operated in a different universe from that of the 21st century. Yet at the same time, she provides much illumination for the burgeoning field of museum studies."—Peter Stansky, Stanford University

"This book provides an important new view of the development of art galleries in three industrial cities: Birmingham, Manchester, and Liverpool. Woodson-Boulton uses the nineteenth-century debates about the purposes of art to examine closely the reformers' belief that art museums could help counteract the moral and aesthetic problems of industrial society. This book will add significantly to the literature on museums, art, culture, and urban development."—Anne Rodrick, Wofford College

Why did British industrial cities build art museums? By exploring the histories of the municipal art museums in Birmingham, Liverpool, and Manchester, Transformative Beauty examines the underlying logic of the Victorian art museum movement. These museums attempted to create a space free from the moral and physical ugliness of industrial capitalism. Deeply engaged with the social criticism of John Ruskin, reformers created a new, prominent urban institution, a domesticated public space that not only aimed to provide refuge from the corrosive effects of industrial society but also provided a remarkably unified secular alternative to traditional religion. Woodson-Boulton raises provocative questions about the meaning and use of art in relation to artistic practice, urban development, social justice, education, and class. In today's context of global austerity and shrinking government support of public cultural institutions, this book is a timely consideration of arts policy and purposes in modern society.

Amy Woodson-Boulton is Associate Professor of Modern British and Irish History at Loyola Marymount University. She is co-editor, with Minsoo Kang, of Visions of the Industrial Age, 18301914 (2008).




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