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Selling under the Swastika
Advertising and Commercial Culture in Nazi Germany

Pamela E. Swett


2013

360 pp.
ISBN: 9780804773553
Cloth $65.00
ISBN: 9780804788830
E-book $65.00

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"Through six carefully constructed chapters, Swett tests recent theories suggesting that in everyday life in Nazi Germany, Germans externalized the tropes of the regime even when they did not subscribe to its ideology . . . This very important study sheds new light on sociocultural facets of Nazi Germany and helps dissect the evolution of advertising in the 20th century . . . Highly recommended."—G.P. de Syon, CHOICE

"An impressively researched study of an important subject. Selling under the Swastika combines cultural history with business history to present a detailed picture of advertising in Germany from the Weimar period to the early post-war years, and offers fascinating insight into the commercial and public sphere in Nazi Germany."—Richard Bessel, University of York

"In this provocative and original analysis, Swett shows how the bright world of brand names, advertising slogans, and shopping expeditions nestled itself into the racial imperatives of the Third Reich as 'Aryans' sought the pleasures and entitlements of consumption."—Peter Fritzsche, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Selling under the Swastika is the first in-depth study of commercial advertising in the Third Reich. While scholars have focused extensively on the political propaganda that infused daily life in Nazi Germany, they have paid little attention to the role played by commercial ads and sales culture in legitimizing and stabilizing the regime. Historian Pamela Swett explores the extent of the transformation of the German ads industry from the internationally infused republican era that preceded 1933 through the relative calm of the mid-1930s and into the war years. She argues that advertisements helped to normalize the concept of a "racial community," and that individual consumption played a larger role in the Nazi worldview than is often assumed. Furthermore, Selling under the Swastika demonstrates that commercial actors at all levels, from traveling sales representatives to company executives and ad designers, enjoyed relative independence as they sought to enhance their professional status and boost profits through the manipulation of National Socialist messages.

Pamela E. Swett is associate professor of history at McMaster University. She is the author of Neighbors and Enemies: The Culture of Radicalism in Berlin, 19291933 (2004).



Subject link:     History — European

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