Home Ownership and Social Inequality in Comparative Perspective
Edited by Karin Kurz and Hans-Peter Blossfeld

BUY THIS BOOK


Contributors

Contributors

Irit Adler is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tel Aviv University.  She is writing her dissertation on the role of the welfare state in Israel in shaping housing inequality among groups of varying ethnicity and national origin.

Fabrizio Bernardi is associate professor of social structure in the Department of Sociology II of the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia in Madrid.  His main research interests are social inequality and the relationship between labor markets and family dynamics.

Hans-Peter Blossfeld is professor and chair of sociology at the Otto Friedrich University Bamberg, Germany.  His research interests include social inequality, sociology of the family, educational sociology, labor market research, demography, social stratification, quantitative methods, and longitudinal data analysis.

Anna Cabré Pla, of the Department of Geography of the Autonomous University of Barcelona, is director of the Centre d'Estudis Demogràfics.  Her main research interests lie in the field of demography.

Daniel Courgeau is an emeritus research director at the Institut National d'Études Démographiques, Paris.  He is currently working on multilevel analyses of life history surveys and on the methodology and epistemology of demography and social sciences.

John Ermisch is a professor at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex and a Fellow of the British Academy.  Formerly (1991-1994), he was Bonar-Macfie Professor in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Glasgow.  His research is broadly concerned with how markets interact with household and demographic decisions.

Tony Fahey is a research professor at the Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin.  His interests include housing, the family, the quality of life in Europe, various aspects of demography, and attitudes and values.

Veerle Geurts is a researcher in the Research Group on Poverty, Social Exclusion and the City (OASES) within the Department of Sociology and Social Policy of Antwerp University.  Her research interests include housing and housing policy.

Luc Goossens teaches sociology, public administration, and housing in the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences of the University of Antwerp.  He is a senior researcher with OASES, and is primarily interested in housing policy, local governance, and residents' movements.

Lars Gulbrandsen is research director at NOVA—Norwegian Social Research.  His research interests include housing, family, and intergenerational transfers.

Brendan Halpin is a professor at the Department of Sociology of the University of Limerick, Ireland.  His research interests include social stratification and social mobility, educational inequality, methods for the analysis of longitudinal data, the dynamics of family formation and divorce, and labor market dynamics.

Karin Kurz is an assistant professor in the Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences at Otto Friedrich University Bamberg, Germany.  Her research interests include social inequality, social stratification, housing, the family, the labor market, and the life course.

Søren Leth-Sørensen, a sociologist, works as a senior advisor at Statistics Denmark.  Currently, his office is at the University of Aarhus.  His main interests are labor market issues and family changes in Denmark.  He played a role in the development of the IDA database, a longitudinal database of people and companies in Denmark.

Noah Lewin-Epstein is a professor and past chairperson of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tel Aviv University.  His research interests include social inequality, ethnic stratification, and labor markets.  He is currently engaged in research on housing and intergenerational determinants of life chances.

Bertrand Maître is a research analyst at the Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin.  He works on a range of Irish and European subjects, analyzing data from the Living in Ireland Panel Survey and the European Community Household Panel.  His current research focuses on poverty and inequality, social exclusion, and income distribution.

George S. Masnick has a Ph.D. in sociology/demography from Brown University.  He taught at the University of Pennsylvania from 1970-1974 and at Harvard University from 1974-1987.  Since "retiring" in 1987, he has been working part-time at Harvard's Joint Center for Housing Studies, where he is a senior research fellow.  Dr. Masnick has done research and writing in the areas of household and family demography, population dynamics, housing, and household forecasting.

Monique Meron works at the Direction de l'Animation de la Recherché, des Etudes et des Statistique (DARES) at the Ministère des Affaires Sociales, du Travail et de la Solidarité.  The research for her work in this book was carried out while she was a member of Daniel Courgeau's research team at the Institut National d'Études Démographiques, Paris.

Juan Antonio Módenes Cabrerizo, of the Department of Geography at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, is a researcher in the Centre d'Estudis Demogràfics.  His main research interests lie in the field of population geography.

Clara H. Mulder is at the Amsterdam Study Centre for the Metropolitan Environment (AME) in the Department of Geography and Planning of the University of Amsterdam.  Her research interests include the connection between household formation and housing.  The research for her work on this book was carried out while she was at the Urban Research Centre Utrecht in the Faculty of Geographical Sciences of Utrecht University, holding a research fellowship from the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Teresio Poggio is a research officer and a doctorate student in the Department of Sociology and Social Research at the University of Trento, Italy.   His primary interests include research on welfare and housing, social inequality, social stratification, and poverty.  He is writing his dissertation on home ownership and social inequality in Italy during the twentieth century.

Moshe Semyonov is a professor of sociology and labor studies in the Faculty of Social Sciences in the Departments of Sociology and Anthropology, and Labor Studies at Tel Aviv University.  He is also a professor of sociology at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  His main research interests lie in the areas of comparative stratification and mobility, immigration and labor migration, and in sources of ethnic and gender inequality in the labor market.