Civil Society and Political Change in Asia
Expanding and Contracting Democratic Space
Edited by Muthiah Alagappa

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Contributors for

Contributors for

CIVIL SOCIETY AND POLITICAL CHANGE IN ASIA

Muthiah Alagappa is director of the East-West Center Washington.  He received a Ph.D. in international affairs from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.  His research interests include international relations theory, international politics in the Asia Pacific region, and comparative politics in Asia.

Edward Aspinall is lecturer in the Department of Chinese and Southeast Asian Studies and Department of History, University of Sydney.  He received a Ph.D. in political science from the Australian National University.  His research interests include Indonesian politics, especially democratization, civil society, and social movements, as well as Indonesian nationalism and the secessionist movement in Aceh.

Amitabh Behar is program officer of the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, New Delhi.  He received an M.Phil. in political science from the Centre for Political Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.  His research interests are governance and civil society, especially decentralized rural self-governance and social movements in central India.

Neil DeVotta is assistant professor of political science at Hartwick College.  He received a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Texas at Austin.  His research interests include civil society and democracy, ethnicity and nationalism, ethnic conflict resolution, globalization and Third World development, and South Asian politics and security.

Yun Fan is assistant fellow at the Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica.  She received a Ph.D. in sociology from Yale University.  Her research interests include social movements, civil society, and collective action.

Jennifer C. Franco is an independent researcher in the Philippines and in the Netherlands.  She received a Ph.D. in politics from Brandeis University.  Her main research interests are peasant movements, land reform, and rural democratization.

Mary E. Gallagher is assistant professor of political science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  She received a Ph.D. in politics from Princeton University.  Her research interests include legal mobilization, state-society relations, and the politics of economic reform in developing and transitional states.

Suzaina Kadir is assistant professor in the Department of Political Science, National University of Singapore.  She received her Ph.D. in political science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  Her research interests include religion and politics, state-society relations, as well as political change and development in Southeast Asia.

Sunhyuk Kim is associate professor in the Department of Public Administration at Korea University.  He received a Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University.  His research interests include comparative democratization, comparative policy analysis, international institutions, and regional integration.

Kyaw Yin Hlaing is assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the National University of Singapore.  He received a Ph.D. in political science from Cornell University.  His research interests include state-society relations, social movements, political culture, democratization, and conflict resolution.

Robert Pekkanen is Luce Junior Fellow in Asian Studies and assistant professor of political science at Middlebury College.  He received his Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University.  His research interests include Japanese civil society, the transformation of indigenous conglomerates in Southeast Asia after the financial crisis of 1997-98, and the effects of electoral system change on political parties and legislative institutions.

Aseem Prakash is a fellow at the Institute for Human Development, New Delhi.  He received an M.Phil. in political science from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.  His research interests include the political economy of development, caste and communal politics, governance and decentralization, and environmental politics.

Aqil Shah is a visiting scholar at the International Forum for Democratic Studies in Washington, D.C.  Beginning fall 2004, he will be a doctoral candidate in political science at Columbia University.

Meredith L. Weiss is assistant professor of international studies at DePaul University.  She received her Ph.D. in political science for Yale University.  Her research interests include social movements and protest in Malaysia and Singapore, Malaysian electoral politics, and the changing nature of ethnicity and communalism in Malaysia.