Cover of The Expanding Spaces of Law by Edited by Irus Braverman, Nicholas Blomley, David Delaney, and Alexandre Kedar
The Expanding Spaces of Law
A Timely Legal Geography
Edited by Irus Braverman, Nicholas Blomley, David Delaney, and Alexandre Kedar

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2014
296 pp.
$55.00
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Cloth ISBN: 9780804787185
Digital ISBN: 9780804791878
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The Expanding Spaces of Law presents readers with cutting-edge scholarship in legal geography. An invaluable resource for those new to this line of scholarship, the book also pushes the boundaries of legal geography, reinvigorating previous modes of inquiry and investigating new directions. It guides scholars interested in the law-space-power nexus to underexplored empirical sites and to novel theoretical and disciplinary resources. Finally, The Expanding Spaces of Law asks readers to think about the temporality and dynamism of legal spaces.

About the author

Irus Braverman is Professor at SUNY Buffalo Law School, the State University of New York.

Nicholas Blomley is Professor of Geography at Simon Fraser University.

David Delaney is Senior Lecturer in Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought at Amherst College.

Alexandre Kedar is Senior Lecturer at the University of Haifa School of Law.

"The Expanding Spaces of Law is the first book to encapsulate the trajectory of the legal geography field and point to its future possibilities in theoretical, methodological and substantive terms. Analyzing the increasing significance of the law-space nexus, this book highlights why all sociolegal scholars should take seriously the geo-political and spatial challenges to the prevailing understandings of law."

—Eve Darian-Smith, Professor, Global & International Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

"The Expanding Spaces of Law vividly illuminates the significant contributions spatial analysis offers to sociolegal studies and to legal anthropology, making clear that an adequate analysis of law and society requires a focus on space and time. The theoretically sophisticated, wide-ranging introduction and empirically rich chapters demonstrate how legal geography enhances the analysis of sociological studies in settings as diverse as Indonesian villages, rural America, and urban Mexico. It offers a valuable introduction to the field as well as a collection of recent, path-breaking work."

—Sally Engle Merry, New York University