Cover of The Nature of Creative Development by Jonathan S. Feinstein
The Nature of Creative Development
Jonathan S. Feinstein

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2006
600 pages.
from $28.95

Cloth ISBN: 9780804745734
Paper ISBN: 9780804761246

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The Nature of Creative Development presents a new understanding of the basis of creativity. Describing patterns of development seen in creative individuals, the author shows how creativity grows out of distinctive interests that often form years before one makes his/her main conributions.

The book is filled with case studies that analyze creative developments across a wide range of fields. The individuals examined range from Virginia Woolf and Albert Einstein to Thomas Edison and Ray Kroc. The text also considers contemporary creatives interviewed by the author.

Feinstein provides a useful framework for those engaged in creative work or in managing such individuals. This text will help the reader understand the nature of creativity, including the difficulties that one may encounter in working creatively and ways to overcome them.

About the author

Jonathan S. Feinstein is the John G. Searle Professor of Economics and Management at the Yale School of Management.

"I consider [The Nature of Creative Development] to be an important step in attempting to understand individual differences in the creative process. Feinstein adopts a theoretical framework which integrates both rich case study detail regarding the individual, and the wider cultural and environment place of these individuals in society. The text is highly affordable and a recommended read."

The Psychologist

"Feinstein has done yeoman work here and should be applauded for bringing the study of creativity, long the preserve of humanities students, into a business school setting. "

The Jewish Journal

"The material presented by Feinstein offers a unique and rich perspective on creative development. The Nature of Creative Development is a highly valuable contribution to the field of creativity studies."

—Ronald E. Purser, San Francisco State University