Models
The Third Dimension of Science
Edited by Soraya de Chadarevian and Nick Hopwood

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Contributors for

Contributors for

Models: The Third Dimension of Science

Malcolm Baker is Professor of Art History, University of Southern California and Professorial Research Fellow, Victoria and Albert Museum, London.  His publications include Figured in Marble: The Making and Viewing of Eighteenth-Century Sculpture (London: V&A Publications; Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2000) and (with David Bindman) Roubiliac and the Eighteenth-Century Monument: Sculpture as Theatre (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995), which was awarded the 1996 Mitchell Prize for the History of Art.

Marcel Boumans is Associate Professor of Philosophy and History of Economics at the University of Amsterdam.  Recent publications include "Built-in justification", in Models as Mediators: Perspectives on Natural and Social Science, edited by Mary S. Morgan and Margaret Morrison (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), and "Fisher's instrumental approach to index numbers", in The Age of Economic Measurement, edited by Judy L. Klein and Mary S. Morgan (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2001).

Soraya de Chadarevian is Senior Research Associate and Affiliated Lecturer in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge.  She is the author of Designs for Life: Molecular Biology after World War II (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2002) and co-editor of Molecularizing Biology and Medicine: New Practices and Alliances, 1910s—1970s (London: Harwood, 1998).

Christopher Evans is Director of the Cambridge Archaeological Unit, University of Cambridge.  He has undertaken several major excavations in Britain, and is currently involved in ethno-archaeological researches in Nepal and Inner Mongolia.  He has published widely on the history of archaeology and its representation.

Eric Francoeur is Lecturer at the École de technologie supérieure, Montreal.  His publications include "The forgotten tool: The design and use of molecular models", in Social Studies of Science 27 (1997), and "Molecular models and the articulation of structural constraints in chemistry", in Tools and Modes of Representation in the Laboratory Sciences, edited by Ursula Klein (Dordrecht: Kluwer, 2001).

James Griesemer is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Davis.  He has published widely on the history, philosophy, and sociology of biology, especially on conceptual and experimental practices in evolutionary biology, models in natural history museum work, visual representation in biology, and the foundations of evolutionary theory.  He has recently co-edited Tibor Gánti's The Principles of Life (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003).

Nick Hopwood is Lecturer in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge.  His publications include Embryos in Wax: Models from the Ziegler Studio (Cambridge: Whipple Museum of the History of Science; Bern: Institute of the History of Medicine, 2002).

Ludmilla Jordanova is Director of the Centre for Research in the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at the University of Cambridge.  Recent books include Nature Displayed: Gender, Science, and Medicine, 1760-1820 (London: Longman, 1999), History in Practice (London: Arnold, 2000) and Defining Features: Medical and Scientific Portraits, 1660-2000 (London: National Portrait Gallery and Reaktion, 2000).

Renato G. Mazzolini is Professor the History of Science at the University of Trento, Italy.  He is the author of The Iris in Eighteenth-Century Physiology (Bern: Huber, 1980) and (with Shirley A. Roe) Science against the Unbelievers (Oxford: Voltaire Foundation, 1986), and editor of Non-Verbal Communication in Science prior to 1900 (Florence: Olschki, 1993).

Herbert Mehrtens is Professor of Modern History at the Technical University, Braunschweig, Germany.  He is the author of Modern—Sprache—Mathematik (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1990), and co-editor of Naturwissenschaft, Technik und NS-Ideologie (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1980) and Social History of Nineteenth-Century Mathematics (Boston: Birkhauser, 1981).

Christoph Meinel is Professor of History of Science at the University of Regensburg, Germany.  He has published widely in the history of chemistry, including editing several volumes, most recently Experiment—InstrumentHostorische Studien  (Berlin: Verlag für Geschichte der Naturweissenschaften und Technik, 2000).

Mary S. Morgan is Professor of History of Economics at the London School of Economics and Professor of History and Philosophy of Economics at the University of Amsterdam.  She is co-editor of Models as Mediators: Perspectives on Natural and Social Science (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), Empirical Models and Policy-Making: Interaction and Institutions (London: Routledge, 2000), and The Age of Economic Measurement (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2001).

Lynn K. Nyhart is Associate Professor of the History of Science at the University of Wisconsin—Madison and the author of Biology Takes Form: Animal Morphology and the German Universities, 1800-1900 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995).  Her current research is on zoology and the rise of an environmentally and visually oriented approach to nature.

Simon Schaffer is Reader in History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge.  He is the co-editor of The Uses of Experiment: Studies in the Natural Scienes (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989) and The Sciences in Enlightened Europe (Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1999), and has published several papers on mechanics, electricity, and experimental philosophy in eighteenth-century Euope.

Thomas Schnalke is Professor of the History of Medicine and Director of the Medical Historical Museum at the Charité, Berlin.  He is the author, among many other works, of Diseases in Wax: The History of the Medical Moulage (Berlin: Quintessence, 1995).

James A. Secord is Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge.  He co-edited Cultures of Natural History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), and is the author, most recently, of Victorian Sensation: The Extraordinary Publication, Reception, and Secret Authorship of Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000).

Jérôme Segal is Assistant Professor of History of Science and Epistemology at the Institut Universitaire de Formation des Maîtres, Paris.  Trained in engineering and in history, he has published on the history of information theory and of molecular biology.  He is the author of Le zéro et le un: Histoire de la notion scientifique d'information au 20e siècle (Paris: Syllepse, 2003).