The Handbook of Negotiation and Culture
Edited by Michele J. Gelfand and Jeanne M. Brett

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Contributors for

Contributors for

The Handbook of Negotiation and Culture

Michele J. Gelfand (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is associate professor of organizational psychology at the University of Maryland.  Her research focuses on cultural influences on negotiation, mediation, justice, and revenge; sexual harassment and discrimination; and basic theory and method in assessing aspects of culture.  She received the Ernest J. McCormick Award for Early Career Contribution from the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the Cummings Scholar Award from the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management.

Jeanne M. Brett (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is the DeWitt W. Buchanan, Jr., distinguished professor of dispute resolution and organizations at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University.  She has contributed to theory and practice across a wide range of topics in dispute resolution, dispute systems design, third-party procedures and procedural justice.  Most recently, she has provided evidence for the effect of culture on negotiators' goals, their conception of power, their strategies for sharing information, and their cooperation.  She is a coauthor of Getting Disputes Resolved and the author of Negotiating Globally.

Wendi L. Adair (Ph.D., Northwestern University) is assistant professor of organization behavior at the Johnson Graduate School of Business of Cornell University.  Her dissertation research investigating the role of culture and communications in negotiations won the 2002 International Association of Conflict Management Award.

Zoe I. Barsness (Ph.D., Northwestern University) is assistant professor of business administration at the University of Washington, Tacoma.  Her research focuses on teams, diversity, conflict resolution, and the impact of alternative work arrangement and technology in the workplace.

Bruce Barry (Ph.D., University of North Carolina) is professor of management and sociology at Vanderbilt University.  His research on social processes in organizations, including negotiations, interpersonal influence, procedural justice, communication, and group dynamics, has been published in a variety of journals specializing in management, psychology and negotiation.

Anita D. Bhappu (Ph.D., University of Arizona) is assistant professor of management and organizations at the Cox School of Business, Southern Methodist University.  She studies how the interactions and outcomes of diverse work teams are impacted by the use of computer-mediated communication technologies like e-mail and group-decision support systems.

Steven L. Blader (Ph.D., New York University) is assistant professor of management at the Stern School of Business, New York University.  His research investigates how people perceive and react to procedural fairness, with an emphasis on the motivations that influence those perceptions and reactions.

Deborah A. Cai (Ph.D., Michigan State University) is associate professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Maryland.  As an international researcher with ties to China, her scholarly interests center on intercultural communication, negotiation, and conflict management, particularly the effect of contextual factors and their interaction with culture.

Peter J. Carnevale (Ph.D., State University of New York, Buffalo) is professor of psychology at New York University.  His research interests are the social, cognitive, and culture aspects of agreement, with a focus on negotiation, third-party intervention, and the design of dispute resolution systems.  He is a recent recipient of the International Association for Conflict Management's Theory to Practice Award.

Yeow Siah Cha (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is assistant professor of psychology at the National University of Singapore.  His research focuses on the problems of cooperation in social dilemmas and negotiation.

Donald E. Conlon (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is professor of management at Michigan State University.  His research examines the dynamics of intense work groups, justice issues in organizations, negotiation and third-party dispute intervention, and decision making.

Rachel T.A. Croson (Ph.D., Harvard University) is associate professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.  Her research uses experimental methods from psychology to test game-theoretic predictions from economics, and her aim to is integrate psychological concerns with mainstream economic theory.

Carsten K. W. De Dreu (Ph.D., University of Groningen) is professor of organizational psychology at the University of Amsterdam and research director of the Kurt Lewin Graduate School for Social Psychology.  He has published award-winning papers on social influence, organizational conflict, negotiation, and interpersonal relations.

Sam Fraidin (Ph.D., University of Illinois and J.D., Yale University) is postdoctoral fellow at the University of Southern California Law School.  He studies group decision making, communication, and negotiation.

Ingrid Smithy Fulmer (Ph.D., Vanderbilt University) is assistant professor in the Department of Management at Michigan State University.  She is interested in the effects of individual differences on social processes such as negotiation and group dynamics and the impact of communication media on interpersonal influence within organizations.

Shirli Kopelman (Ph.D., Northwestern University) is visiting assistant professor at the University of Michigan Business School.  She studies social motives in social dilemmas and emotion in negotiation.

Roderick M. Kramer (Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles) is the William R. Kimball Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University.  His current research interests are trust and distrust in organizations, organizational paranoia, cooperation, and organizational creativity.

Carol T. Kulik (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is professor of management at the University of Melbourne.  Her research encompasses cognitive processes, demographic diversity, and procedural fairness in organizations.  She is especially interested in how demographic congruence influences perceptions of fair treatment.

Rajesh Kumar (Ph.D., New York University) is associate professor of international business at the Aarhus School of Business in Denmark.  He researches cross-cultural negotiations, interorganizational collaboration, and emotional dynamics in organizations.

Kwok Leung (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is professor of management at the City University of Hong Kong.  He publishes widely on justice, conflict, research methods, and culture.

Kathleen L. McGinn (Ph.D., Northwestern University) is professor of negotiations, organizations, and markets at the Harvard Business School.  Her research focuses on interpersonal improvisations and their role in decisions, conflict, and resource allocation within organizations.

David M. Messick (Ph.D., University of North Carolina) is the Morris and Alice Kaplan Professor of Ethics and Decisions in Management at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, and director of the Ford Motor Center for Global Citizenship at Kellogg.  He is interested in the ethical and social aspects of decision making and information processing, and the psychology of leadership.

Christopher J. Meyer is a doctoral student in the Department of Management at Michigan State University.  His research interests include organizational justice, conflict, and managing bad news in organizations.

Michael W. Morris (Ph.D., University of Michigan) is a professor in the Graduate School of Business in the Department of Psychology, Columbia University.  He does basic research on the role of culture in shaping social cognitive tendencies in the context of social judgment.  He is also interested in the role of emotions in decision making.

Margaret A. Neale (Ph.D., University of Texas) is the John G. McCoy—Banc One Corporation Professor of Organizations and Dispute Resolution at the Graduate School of Management, Stanford University.  She is the author of numerous articles on bargaining and negotiation, distributed work groups, and team composition, learning, and performance.

Mara Olekalns (Ph.D., University of Adelaide) is professor of management (negotiations) at the Melbourne Business School, University of Melbourne, Australia.  Her principal interest is in studying how negotiators sequence their strategies and their ability to create value.  She has investigated a range of situational and personality factors that shape the choice and sequencing of strategy.

Debra L. Shapiro (Ph.D., Northwestern University) is a professor in the Management and Organizations Department at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland—College Park.  She has received numerous "best paper" awards for her research on managing conflict in organizational settings.

Marwan Sinaceur is a doctoral candidate in organizational behavior at the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University.  His research focuses on interpersonal behaviors and perceptions in negotiations.

Leigh Thompson (Ph.D., Northwestern University) is the J. Jay Gerber Distinguished Professor of Dispute Resolution and Organizations and director of the Kellogg Teams and Groups Center at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University.  She is a prolific scholar on topics of negotiation, group decision making, learning, and creativity, and the author of The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator and Making the Team: A Guide for Managers.

Catherine H. Tinsley (Ph.D., Northwestern University) is an associate professor at the McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University.  She studies how culture, negotiators' reputations, and perceptions of fairness influence negotiation processes and outcomes.

Kwok-kit Tong (Ph.D., Chinese University, Hong Kong) is a research fellow in the Department of Management, City University of Hong Kong.  He is particularly interested in how contextual factors affect justice judgments.

Tom Tyler (Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles) is University Professor at New York University.  His research investigates the role of justice in conflict resolution and the exercise of authority.  His books include The Social Psychology of Procedural Justice, Why People Obey the Law, Trust in Organizations, Social Justice in a Diverse Society, and Cooperation in Groups.

Gerben Van Kleef (Ph.D., University of Amsterdam) is assistant professor of solid psychology at University of Amsterdam.  He studies interpersonal effects of emotions in negotiations and is also interested in the effects of power differences on negotiators' behaviors and outcomes.

Ching Wang is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychology, University of Illinois.  She is interested in interpersonal communication and cross-cultural psychology in the context of negotiation and dispute resolution.

J. Mark Weber (Ph.D., Northwestern University) is an assistant professor of organizational behavior at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.  Mark has a master's degree in social psychology from McGill University and a master's degree in business administration from Wilfred Laurier University.  His primary research interests include cooperation, trust, negotiations, the role of values in decision makign, and social and organizational identity processes.

Laurie R. Weingart (PhD., Northwestern University) is professor of organizational behavior at the Graduate School of Industrial Administration at Carnegie Mellon University.  Her research focuses on the conflict management and decision processes of integrated product development teams and the social interaction and cognitive processes of negotiating dyads and groups.