Witnesses of the Unseen
Seven Years in Guantanamo
Lakhdar Boumediene and Mustafa Ait Idir

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Contents and Abstracts
1
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In Chapter 1, Lakhdar recounts his childhood in rural Algeria and his young adulthood in Pakistan, Yemen, and Albania. He then describes settling down in Bosnia, starting a family, and assisting orphans as an employee of the Red Crescent. The chapter concludes with Lakhdar's memories of September 11, 2001.

2
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In Chapter 2, Mustafa recounts his childhood in Algiers and his young adulthood in Croatia. He then describes settling down in Bosnia, starting a family, and working as a computer technician for the charitable organization Taibah International while also being a member of the Bosnian karate team. The chapter concludes with Mustafa's memories of September 11, 2001.

3
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In Chapter 3, Lakhdar describes being arrested by Bosnian police, accused of plotting to attack the U.S. Embassy Sarajevo, and held in a Bosnian jail cell for three months before being "released" into the arms of an American special operations team.

4
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In Chapter 4, Mustafa describes being arrested by Bosnian police, accused of plotting to attack the U.S. Embassy Sarajevo, and held in a Bosnian jail cell for three months before being "released" into the arms of an American special operations team.

5
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In Chapter 5, Lakhdar recounts being taken to the American military base in Butmir, on the outskirts of Sarajevo, and from there to a base in Tuzla, Bosnia, from which he was flown to Turkey and then on to Guantanamo. He describes the physical and psychological abuse he endured en route.

6
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In Chapter 6, Mustafa recounts being taken to the American military base in Butmir, on the outskirts of Sarajevo, and from there to a base in Tuzla, Bosnia, from which he was flown to Turkey and then on to Guantanamo. He describes the physical and psychological abuse he endured en route.

7
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In Chapter 7, Lakhdar describes his early days in Guantanamo, when he was held in an outdoor animal cage in Camp X-Ray. He shares stories about his cell neighbors, living conditions, medical treatment, and the guards and interpreters.

8
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In Chapter 8, Mustafa describes his early days in Guantanamo, when he was held in an outdoor animal cage in Camp X-Ray. He shares stories about his cell neighbors, living conditions, medical treatment, and the guards.

9
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In Chapter 9, Lakhdar recounts his experiences being interrogated for the first time. He also shares more details about living conditions in Camp X-Ray.

10
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In Chapter 10, Mustafa recounts being brought from the outdoor cages of Camp X-Ray to the indoor cells of Camp Delta. He also describes his early interrogations and various punishments he endured, including solitary confinement and being sexually harassed by a female interrogator.

11
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In Chapter 11, Lakhdar describes life in Camp Delta, being held in solitary confinement, being physically abused during interrogations, and refusing to speak or eat for more than two weeks.

12
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In Chapter 12, Mustafa describes the everyday hardships of Guantanamo, detainees' efforts to communicate with their families, and doctors' refusal to provide medical treatment unless he provided information to his interrogators.

13
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In Chapter 13, Lakhdar describes the Combatant Status Review Tribunal process, explains why he refused to attend his own "show trial," and recounts his participation as a character witness in Hadj Boudella and Mohamed Nechla's tribunals.

14
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In Chapter 14, Mustafa explains why he decided to attend his Combatant Status Review Tribunal and recounts the testimony that he delivered.

15
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In Chapter 15, Lakhdar recounts his initial meeting with the WilmerHale lawyers, who would go on to argue his habeas corpus<\i> case, and shares his initial concern about challenging a U.S. President in a lawsuit, Boumediene v. Bush<\i>, that bore his name.

16
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In Chapter 16, Mustafa describes his interactions with the WilmerHale legal team that argued his habeas corpus<\i> case and expresses his gratitude for their pro bono<\i> work.

17
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In Chapter 17, Lakhdar recounts the psychological abuse he endured at the hands of one interrogator, nicknamed "The Elephant." He also describes the living conditions in Camp Romeo, where he was held for much of his time in Guantanamo, and he relays a conversation he had with a visiting Bosnian official about his plight.

18
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In Chapter 18, Mustafa describes an incident in which he was forcibly extracted from his cell and brutally beaten by a team of guards, causing injuries from which he will never fully recover.

19
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In Chapter 19, Lakhdar recounts witnessing the guards abuse Mustafa and then speaking with Mustafa afterward. He also offers more detail about the living conditions in Camp Romeo and his ongoing interactions with "The Elephant."

20
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In Chapter 20, Mustafa describes his slow, painful recovery from being brutally beaten, offering an account of the guards who tried to help him and the various ways in which doctors and nurses either refused to treat or mistreated his injuries.

21
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In Chapter 21, Lakhdar reflects on various ways in which the guards showed disrespect to each other, to prisoners, and to Islam. He then calls for a non-violent response to these affronts, and recounts a conversation he had with a respectful, compassionate guard.

22
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In Chapter 22, Mustafa describes the affronts to Islam that he witnessed and the powerlessness he felt to do anything about it.

23
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In Chapter 23, Lakhdar explains his decision to begin a hunger strike and describes the experience of being force-fed through a tube. He also recounts a conversation with Belkacem Bensayah and a few moments of levity amid the horrors of Guantanamo.

24
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In Chapter 24, Mustafa describes the hardship of being separated from his family and the experience of hearing his five-year-old son's voice for the very first time during a telephone conversation.

25
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In Chapter 25, Lakhdar describes how he learned about the Supreme Court's ruling in Boumediene v. Bush<\i>. He then recounts watching, on a teleconference screen in what had once been an interrogation room, as his habeas<\i> hearing unfolded hundreds of miles away in Judge Leon's Washington, D.C. courtroom.

26
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In Chapter 26, Mustafa shares his thoughts about the habeas corpus hearing, testifying by teleconference, and hearing Judge Leon announce the ruling in his case.

27
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In Chapter 27, Lakhdar describes how the guards and other detainees reacted to Judge Leon's ruling, and explains why he was determined to maintain his hunger strike even after Judge Leon ordered his release.

28
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In Chapter 28, Mustafa recounts his last month in Guantanamo, describing how he was still treated as a guilty man even in his final days there.

29
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In Chapter 29, Lakhdar describes finding out, just hours before the plane to Bosnia took off, that he would not be allowed to return to Bosnia. He recounts waiting months in Guantanamo before another country, France, agreed to accept him, and he shares some details about his last days in Guantanamo and the plane flight to France.

30
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In Chapter 30, Mustafa recounts landing in Sarajevo, being driven to his house by Bosnian officials, and seeing his son running behind the car as they pulled into the driveway of his home.

31
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In Chapter 31, Lakhdar recounts being flown to Paris, being reunited with his family, and readjusting to regular meals and post-Guantanamo life.

Epilogue:
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In his Epilogue, Mustafa describes his post-Guantanamo life as a teacher, shop owner, karate coach, and father. He also shares his thoughts on the lessons he hopes we will learn from what he went through.

Epilogue:
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In his Epilogue, Lakhdar describes his post-Guantanamo life in a small town outside of Nice, France. He discusses the ways in which Guantanamo changed him, the joys and struggles of becoming reacquainted with his family, and the birth of his youngest son, Yusuf. Chapter keywords: Nice, France; PTSD; temper; Youssef Boumediene.